Bob Esponja | Sense8 – Saison 1 | alleskino
For 381 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 33% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 66% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 10.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Steve Davis' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 53
Highest review score: 100 Million Dollar Baby
Lowest review score: 0 Baby Geniuses
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 87 out of 381
381 movie reviews
    • 83 Metascore
    • 78 Steve Davis
    Even the documentary crew, composed of seasoned climbers and longtime friends, can barely watch their buddy painstakingly move up the peak.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 89 Steve Davis
    The beauty of Redford’s rock-steady performances over the last six decades or so is that he never showed off, and yet always commanded your attention.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 30 Steve Davis
    A serviceable cast of unfamiliar actors (the exception: Thompson as the family matriarch, Marmee); a serviceable script that takes few if any chances, with occasional wordless montages of shiny happy people; and serviceable direction that gets the job done and nothing more.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 78 Steve Davis
    Don’t expect any hokey scare tactics here. Under the steady hand of Oscar-nominated director Abrahamson (Room), the film is a calculated slow burn, one that plays a cunning head game with those viewers willing to be entranced.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Steve Davis
    40 Years in the Making is a cliquey undertaking that leaves you mostly on the outside looking in, but after witnessing the joy of its participants at the end, there’s little to begrudge.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Steve Davis
    Despite the often unsettling subject matter, this adaptation of Emily M. Danforth's teen novel isn’t an intense experience: no big confrontational scenes, few (if any) histrionic moments.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Steve Davis
    Burnham’s sociological precision as a screenwriter and director, however, would likely not feel as genuine if not for Fisher in the pivotal role of Kayla. She doesn’t act the part as much as she breathes it. It may be the most honest performance you’ll see in a movie this year.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 89 Steve Davis
    Three Identical Strangers may not achieve the kind of redemptive catharsis we wish for here, but it achieves something almost as miraculous, making an otherwise unbelievable story seem believably real.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 67 Steve Davis
    It’s one of the few narration-dependent films in recent years in which the words don’t get in the way of the story.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 67 Steve Davis
    It’s a daunting task to mount a stage production of the play these days, given the college-lit symbolism embodied by its hapless titular bird and the narrative arcs to which today’s audiences are accustomed, much less adapt it for the big screen and still remain true to Chekhov’s delicate dramatic sensibilities. Either way, it’s an uphill climb. This film adaptation of this seminal play (the fourth, by most counts) gets about halfway up the hill.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 0 Steve Davis
    Stupefyingly inane buddy-cop comedy.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Steve Davis
    With more than a passing nod to the far classier "Panic Room," this derivative seat-squirmer has a few good moments in spite of Johnny Klimick’s annoying score, its energy powered by the raw determination of its Mother Courage.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 78 Steve Davis
    All three principal actors – Weisz, McAdams, and Nivola – give effectively constrained performances. They work as a team here, consistent with the delicate balance in their characters’ complicated relationships with one another.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 30 Steve Davis
    Noble intentions, ignoble results.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Steve Davis
    What ultimately disappoints here, however, is the conventionality of the movie’s narrative arc, its mushy characterizations (as the cosmetic company heiress who befriends Renee, a squeaky-voiced Williams is utterly dispensable), and a rushed conclusion that ties up the loose ends with a sloppy bow that diminishes the movie’s message.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 67 Steve Davis
    Refreshingly unsentimental and straightforward.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 40 Steve Davis
    To its credit, this third GND installment earnestly attempts to give some degree of lip service to diverging perspectives on the socio-religious-political scale without too much proselytizing, although there’s never any question about who’s side it’s on.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Steve Davis
    Iconoclastic British environmentalist and sculptor Andy Goldsworthy doesn’t experience the world in the same way the rest of us do. Using more than just the conventional five senses, he profoundly intuits his surroundings as if in a meditative trance, mentally and physically absorbing the details of his environment like a forensic scientist in the pursuit of a unique artistry that’s brought him worldwide acclaim.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Steve Davis
    When the movie shifts from psychological to physical terror, the film (like Sawyer) unravels and finally loses its bearings.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 78 Steve Davis
    It’s a cliched happy ending, one you’ve seen countless times before, but never in this way.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 67 Steve Davis
    The movie has a floppy vibe to it, teetering on lazy farce in its mixed marriage of dry humor and flashes of violence.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 78 Steve Davis
    Without preaching from the pulpit, A Fantastic Woman powerfully communicates the hostility and hatred that persons such as Marina encounter simply due to their otherness. In its way, it resembles those Hollywood-era message movies like "Gentleman’s Agreement" and "Pinky," but without the self-congratulatory importance that weighs those films down with all the subtlety of an iron anchor.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Steve Davis
    You could say it’s toothless most of the time.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 30 Steve Davis
    Given its can’t-miss potential, you’d think this would be one kick-ass movie. So why is The 15:17 to Paris such a trainwreck?
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Steve Davis
    Although it has the smell of self-importance, like a Michael Cimino movie on steroids, Den of Thieves ultimately fools no one. It’s all about the guns.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 30 Steve Davis
    As the bombastic musical numbers vie to outdo each other (in one scene, lovebirds Efron and Zendaya appear to be auditioning for Cirque du Soleil), the song-and-dance man gets lost in the scenery, his charisma overwhelmed by director Gracey’s misguided preoccupation with razzle dazzle at full throttle.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Steve Davis
    A nagging question persists throughout Darkest Hour: Is Oldman’s compulsively meticulous turn here anything more than a brilliant impersonation? The answer is yes, but it’s a performance that always stands apart from the rest of the film.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Steve Davis
    Unlike "Manhattan," this perfunctorily conceived film about an unhappy woman starved for romantic and personal fulfillment never lives up to its brilliant production values.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 78 Steve Davis
    This film is a pleasurable experience, but it’s a frustrating one as well. There’s a nagging feeling we should expect something more from this guy. To borrow the most quotable line of dialogue from "The Room" (bellowed at the top of the lungs): “YOU ARE TEARING ME APART, FRANCO!”
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Steve Davis
    The film wears its ambitions on its sleeve as it daisy chains from lover to lover, intently focused on maintaining the rhythm of its segues from vignette to vignette to the detriment of any profound insight into its linked characters’ mostly unhappy love lives.

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