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Michael Haigis

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For 44 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 27% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 69% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Michael Haigis' Scores

Average review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 The Deuce: Season 2
Lowest review score: 25 The Gifted: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 32 out of 44
  2. Negative: 6 out of 44
44 tv reviews
    • 49 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Haigis
    Created and co-written by Lena Dunham, Camping is replete with characters who are more layered than they initially appear.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Haigis
    Amazon’s The Romanoffs, an anthology series co-written and directed by Matthew Weiner, is ambitious but disappointingly inconsistent.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Haigis
    The conclusion of Maniac is only slightly ambiguous, and testifies clearly to the simplified truth that embracing human connectivity opens a person up to the power of healing. This saccharine conclusion fits the series, which, while impressive for its detailed and certainly imaginative world building, rarely dares to truly confound its audience--or challenge us with an assessment of mental health that doesn’t amount to hallmark sentimentality.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 38 Michael Haigis
    A formulaic exercise that aspires to emotional resonance. While it occasionally succeeds, specifically with regard to Grace’s characterization, the series mostly gets bogged down in arbitrary plotting and leads to a climax that manages to shock only because it’s so unbelievable.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Haigis
    American Vandal is filled with thoroughly sketched, instantly recognizable high-school types, but Kevin is a logjam of too many idiosyncrasies, and the series offers only the most cursory explanations for his quirks.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Michael Haigis
    Overall, The Deuce formulates an intoxicating anthropology, characterized in equal measure by both possibility and sentimentality.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Haigis
    Despite paying cursory service to humanizing its principal characters, Jack Ryan is mostly interested in a battle between broad notions of good and evil. It thrives on the tension of Jack's chess match with bin Suleiman, reducing an entire nation's efforts to combat terror to a personal beef between two archetypes.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Haigis
    Ozark is conspicuously going about correcting past wrongs. As a result, it feels newly and brazenly confident, steamrolling through story at a pace that seems to reflect an active decision on the part of the show's writers to find that perfect sweet spot between the arty and smart, unpretentious pulp.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Haigis
    By plotting a serialized narrative within Dreamland's unique landscape, Disenchantment only slightly tweaks the hermetic formula of Groening's other shows. Yet with Bean, a hilariously restive, subversive, and ambitious protagonist, the series has the potential to transcend its stock roots.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Haigis
    Despite the show's topical, poignant portrayals of economic anxiety, however, it remains an airy affair: The workaday drama at Liz's restaurant unfolds as dark comedy, and the lodge offers Ernie and his fellow Lynx a fanciful escape from reality.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Haigis
    Its puzzle-box plot is the Stephen King Mad Libs version of a straightforward mystery that, even in its most engrossing moments, lacks the pulpy imagination of the author's finest work. There are jump scares, and one sequence involving a children's game is disturbing, but even at its most frightening, Castle Rock is never surprising.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Haigis
    Sharp Objects views Camille's assignment, and confrontation with her past, as a laudable, necessary undertaking. Perhaps because it's framed through Camille's perspective, the series is unrelentingly pessimistic. Yet beneath its grimness, Sharp Objects ultimately testifies to the triumph of survival, no matter how ugly or desperate a form it takes.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Haigis
    [Luke Cage's] personal desires are in direct competition with his obligations as a celebrity and role model. The Netflix series struggles to coalesce those roles and present Cage as one coherent, if conflicted, person; instead, we see different iterations of the hero from episode to episode. It's a flaw that makes for a season of Luke Cage that's alternately bland and thrilling, formulaic and insightful--which is to say, as variable as Luke Cage himself.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Haigis
    Costner's years of playing leathery, down-home figures lend gravity and comfortable familiarity to the role, but Dutton remains a rote exercise. ... The Dutton children are more intriguing characters than their father, perhaps because being lorded over by such a demanding figure has afflicted them with rather nuanced flaws.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Haigis
    By returning to a relatively more linear narrative, not to mention its truly ensemble roots, Arrested Development has given something back to us by remembering that the Bluths are fundamentally bound by idiosyncrasy. At its best, the series continues to deftly skewer the interpersonal dynamics of a hilariously dysfunctional family.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 88 Michael Haigis
    The series is both emotionally resonant and thought-provoking when motivations are complicated by personal experience, such as Sam's biracial parentage, or Coco's resentment of her white peers.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Haigis
    The Handmaid's Tale remains intellectually nourishing, easy to admire, and difficult to endure. It's a beautiful test of stamina, offering only small reprieves from June's suffering. It embeds us alongside her, and remains dedicated to illustrating how exactly the villains can win.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Haigis
    Yet while the series is evolving somewhat beyond the hermetic, enigmatic structure of its first season, it still veers too frequently into simplistic misanthropy. Throughout season two, the newly sentient robots are often as vicious and single-minded as their human captors once were.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Haigis
    Legion presents itself as a maze, but it's more accurately an imaginatively adorned straight line in season two. The series performs an effective illusion: It can be uncanny, but it's rarely truly impenetrable. The flamboyant peculiarity of David's world convinces us that we're seeing something for the first time.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Haigis
    Though the series never gets to the root of his apparent emotional trauma, his woundedness nonetheless acts as an effective balance to the reprehensible actions we see him commit. His self-improvement is realistic, precisely because it comes in fits and starts.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Haigis
    For a series called The Chi, there’s remarkably little here that lends a sense of specificity or a deeper view into the machinations of Chicago’s South Side--or even where in that expansive area the story is unfolding.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Haigis
    The outcome of the kidnapping is known to history, and Trust struggles to mine the saga for new insights.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Haigis
    While Jessica Jones coheres around a persistent view of Jessica (Krysten Ritter) and her friends as survivors, the series too often seems content to simply acknowledge the effects of trauma without offering an original argument about treatment or prevention. It inevitably conforms to comic-book convention, and Jessica's internal strife is overshadowed by her showdown with a super villain.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Haigis
    Whenever it glimpses into the private lives of men like O’Neill, The Looming Tower accentuates these individuals’ character flaws, but it leaves us only with a sense of conflicted anticipation, waiting for O’Neill and his cohorts to return to work so that we can witness their critical failures.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Haigis
    Ultimately, though, the detailed character portrayals at the heart of Seven Seconds invest us into the Butlers' search for justice, while poignantly illustrating that in the real world, that justice is rare.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Haigis
    When the season does intermittently sag beneath the weight of its extensive world-building and philosophical inquiries, Altered Carbon still manages to enthrall audiences with a winding detective mystery told in timeless noir fashion.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Haigis
    The series is defined by an unsettling unreality that evokes the morbid interest that surrounded these events in real time. With its dogged adherence to authenticity, it creates the feeling of witnessing something illicit, suggesting that we're complicit in fulfilling Cunanan's quest to make an impression, by opting to relive his spree at all.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Haigis
    Interesting hypotheticals and shocking plot twists abound, but more than ever, those signatures are in service a broad argument.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Haigis
    By focusing on the internal machinations of Catesby and his Protestant antagonists, Gunpowder locates a human drama at the heart of an event codified in history books as a conflict between monoliths. It turns a curiosity of British lore into a resonant portrait of courage, and a testament to the value of resistance.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Haigis
    The overarching parody of the series becomes repetitive when an already implausible plot literally doubles down on the absurd. ... The entire enterprise is undergirded only by Van Damme's performance; his athleticism lends itself to physical humor that the actor amplifies with surprising comedic timing.

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