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For 140 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 56% higher than the average critic
  • 7% same as the average critic
  • 37% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Erik Adams' Scores

Average review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 W/ Bob & David: Season 1
Lowest review score: 25 Man With a Plan: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 94 out of 140
  2. Negative: 5 out of 140
140 tv reviews
    • 56 Metascore
    • 67 Erik Adams
    There’s something potent there, something fundamentally Weiner-esque. But it just doesn’t connect in these three episodes. And so the show mirrors its characters in yet another way: It falls short of those which came before it.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 91 Erik Adams
    Big Mouth’s general lack of shame and its love of a good anatomical reference is likely to keep the show from getting as big as it ought to be, but it’s shown that it deserves to be included in any conversation about TV’s animated greats. And the new season demonstrates that Big Mouth is capable of growing alongside its characters.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 83 Erik Adams
    Maniac is one of the year’s most refreshing series and a series that always seems 10 seconds away from declaring, “The most complicated computer of all is the human mind.” It’s hypnotizing eye candy that won’t completely nourish the brain or the soul, but it will satiate them for a little bit.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 67 Erik Adams
    Kidding finds Carrey and Gondry drilling into the bedrock of memory and trauma, displaying how two people can perceive and channel the same source of pain in distinctly different fashions. It just doesn’t do a great job of doing that beyond people who aren’t Jeff or his onscreen alter ego. ... There is ambition, talent, and imagination to spare here, which is what makes Kidding worth watching where other, similarly messy cable series in this register aren’t.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 91 Erik Adams
    In order to land some sorrowful emotional beats, these new episodes have to shed some of Better Call Saul’s defining lightheartedness. And make no mistake: The way season four kicks into gear with such confidence and precision has all the markings of Breaking Bad’s clockwork plotting.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 67 Erik Adams
    You may come away from Come Inside My Mind with a better understanding of who Robin Williams was, but a likelier takeaway is in the reaction of that HBO On Location crowd: the laughs, the sense of awe, the expressions that all but say, “How did he do that?”
    • 66 Metascore
    • 58 Erik Adams
    The show excels at bookending its episodes with big set pieces and stylish suspense sequences. It lets the slack out in between, when all those stories have to jockey for position with the mythology and characters, who are still only partially formed nearly halfway through the season. Castle Rock has to have a lot of personality, because a lot of the people living there don’t.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 42 Erik Adams
    Costner delivers one of the most leaden performances in the recent history of marquee stars coming to TV, operating from a baseline of mild irritation that’s modulated only when he’s, say, in mourning, or being shot at in a helicopter. (And even then, just barely.) Much of the cast is out to sea here. ... Part of the show’s failure to connect might have to do with Sheridan (who co-created with fellow Sons Of Anarchy vet John Linson) crafting his characters primarily as symbols.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 58 Erik Adams
    Lost In Space is at its strongest when the unknown is coming for the Robinsons, not the other way around. The Netflix series never fulfills the wasted promise of Lost In Space, but for a show that’s navigating such well-trod territory, it does turn up some intriguing unknowns.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 83 Erik Adams
    Zen Diaries assembles a comprehensive (occasionally too comprehensive) collage from such footage, combining it with home-movies, broadcast clips, vintage audio, new interviews, and excerpts from the copious journal entries the comedian left behind when he died of a heart attack in 2016.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 58 Erik Adams
    Rise is both a production wobbling toward sure footing, and a depiction thereof.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 83 Erik Adams
    More than the love story itself, Love’s greatest achievement might be that it managed to make Gus and Mickey feel like fully realized, complicated individuals independent of their love story.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 91 Erik Adams
    Patience is required by and rewarded in the three episodes screened for critics: Some stage-setting is necessary to illustrate changes in the characters lives, but it also fits with the moseying pace and under-the-influence tenor Glover and director Hiro Murai struck in the first season.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 83 Erik Adams
    At times, A.P. Bio struggles to build a bridge between what’s happening in Jack’s classroom and the rest of Whitlock, but the performances in the B-plots are so uniformly strong, they practically justify these digressions all on their own.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 42 Erik Adams
    In a debut season that eventually frames itself within the shaky alliance between the dweebs of Boring High’s A.V. club and the self-styled outsiders of the drama club, there’s a lot to Everything Sucks! that never gels.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Erik Adams
    The Assassination Of Gianni Versace plays better as parable than reportage. While it never quite becomes the twin narrative of Versace’s and Cunanan’s lives that’s hinted at in the early episodes, it continues using them as mirror images of one another: creator and destroyer, mother’s apprentice and father’s favored child, doting brother and prodigal son.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Erik Adams
    Godless doesn’t reinvent the wagon wheel, but it gets a few good spins out of trusty Western standbys in its too-long seven-hour run. The limited series struggles to recover from an early peak; in the final 20 minutes of the premiere episode, all the pieces for an epic oater fall into place. ... The gunfights are captivating, and Scott Frank sure knows how to pepper in the comic relief, but Godless all comes back to La Belle.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 91 Erik Adams
    Like a super-sized Columbo case, the culprits have already been identified, and they’re shockingly, hilariously tracking bloody footprints across New York City. They, and Search Party, seem like they’re in over their heads at the start, but it only gets better the deeper they go.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Erik Adams
    Nine more episodes of a surprise phenomenon that might be uneven, but still has plenty of power up its sleeve.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Erik Adams
    It marinates in setup, it stubbornly refuses to tip its hand, it treats its story like Silly Putty that can be stretched and stretched and stretched across something that somebody, somewhere is going to label a “10-hour movie.” But everything enthralling about the first two episodes delves deeper and feels more alive than Netflix also-rans like Ozark and Gypsy, from Fincher leaving his signature on the Kemper interviews to the energetic subtleties of Groff’s performance.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 30 Erik Adams
    It’s as exhausting as 22 minutes gets.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Erik Adams
    The Mayor’s first outing doesn’t just throw a worthy ensemble together---it assembles them around the makings of something that could be worth their time and talent.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Erik Adams
    It occurs to me that Ghosted hasn’t had a successful test of its equipment. Blame retooling and a packed-to-bursting script for a pilot that’s startlingly low on laughs, but the moments of zippy comic friction between Scott and Robinson are indications that there’s no sense in worrying about it now.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Erik Adams
    Young Sheldon is caught in an in-between place, destined to flummox those who’d love it the most.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 42 Erik Adams
    What results is a show that isn’t so much daring in its flexibility as it is exhausting in its lack of cohesion. The pilot trudges through scene after scene of setup, and subsequent episodes don’t get much peppier.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 91 Erik Adams
    Ten Years Later is sturdier and better paced than its admittedly great predecessor, but there are times when you’ll look around and wonder, “Where’d everybody go?” And then the complement to that question: “Why is everybody here?” If there’s any definition of the spirit of Camp Firewood, it’s that the people need the place more than the place needs the people.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 Erik Adams
    The grab bag nature of the anthology format is in full effect: Of the six episodes HBO made available to critics, one is truly great, two are good, two are middling, and one is a fascinating mess.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 42 Erik Adams
    Marty and Wendy don’t give Bateman and Linney much cause to stretch. One gets saddled with some sub-Scorsese soliloquies about criminal philosophy; the other has to make subtext into text with lines about vultures circling the Byrds’ and the scrubbing of a damned spot on the family’s dock. ... Derivative and lethargic.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 58 Erik Adams
    It always feels like Friends From College could be exerting a little more effort.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Erik Adams
    That’s I’m Sorry: Reliable, recommendable, satisfying, likable, consistent.

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