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Daniel D'Addario

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For 150 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 52% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Daniel D'Addario's Scores

Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Veep: Season 6
Lowest review score: 10 The Hunt for the Trump Tapes with Tom Arnold: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 87 out of 150
  2. Negative: 18 out of 150
150 tv reviews
    • tbd Metascore
    • 90 Daniel D'Addario
    This show excels at both the daring, gasp-inducing twist and the methodical construction of slower-burning thrills. The finale, for instance, features a lengthy sequence of almost physically painful tension, a bravura bit of television that could only exist on a show in which we’ve been primed to understand that truly anything can happen.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Daniel D'Addario
    All American tends to have more ideas, and sharper ways of expressing them, in Crenshaw than in Beverly Hills — particularly a subplot about Spencer’s dearest friend from home, a butch young lesbian (“Empire” standout Bre-Z) whose religious mother can’t accept her daughter’s truth. But since so much of the action takes place in Beverly Hills, this is a bit of a stumbling block; the show needs to decide what about that milieu is worth our attention.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Daniel D'Addario
    A worthwhile primer for those who are unschooled in the Nixon presidency, the chaos it unleashed, and how the law eventually brought it to heel. ... The element of the film’s early going that works most well is an analysis of Nixon’s mentality towards Vietnam, and the ways in which his paranoid refusal to lose fueled, and was fueled by, the quagmire there. But after that, the film often defaults to revisiting well-known history.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Daniel D'Addario
    That the film, for which the royal family granted access, is so tightly focused on this sort of cultural exchange makes it a somewhat dutiful watch, and an intriguing document of both Elizabeth’s and her heirs’ priorities.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Daniel D'Addario
    Few characters challenge Johnson for dominance or even parity in the first two installments of “Dancing Queen,” and as it goes on, it’d be nice to get a bit more texture of the Beyond Belief community. ... That interplay between earnest parents and the serious side of a fun-loving queen makes for TV that edges up to inspirational. But it’s also just fun.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Daniel D'Addario
    It fundamentally lacks a point-of-view or anything that help it break free from the generic--even as its stars struggle against a tide bearing them back to the bygone era where this show’s jokes seem to have originated. ... Stevens West and Wayans are both young and fun-to-watch, and do their oddball-couple routine without Cooper better than they do the script’s overwrought dithering over whether or not they’re washed-up.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 20 Daniel D'Addario
    An ensemble comedy set at a retirement community, is of startlingly poor quality, and it’s a show whose stars deserve better.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 30 Daniel D'Addario
    The show that once took specific news anchors--even ones from CBS!--to task now defaults to a portrait of “the Wolf network” so generic as to have no bite at all. Murphy, meanwhile, uses her easily won platform as a morning-show anchor to deliver absolutely nothing that will surprise anyone. ... The supporting characters, once quirky and helpful pals to Murphy, now seem drained.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Daniel D'Addario
    "The Body" isn’t good--its cast phones it in, its reliance on gore as punctuation is witless, its final twist can be seen a mile off. But its willingness to play its own game, to be tawdry and cheap in a streaming landscape in which bigger and bolder statements are made, generally, over the course of stately 10- or 13-episode seasons, feels like something unusual, something worth noting even as only diehards may delight in it.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Daniel D'Addario
    A horror series that doesn’t immediately make a case for itself; like the best of the genre, it’s slowly insinuating, building in power as it tells a story of repressed trauma and family discord. It’s an effective scare-fest that is at its best when the tale does more than jolt the viewer.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Daniel D'Addario
    A show with frustratingly little on its mind, The Good Cop quickly establishes its two leads as familiar personality types and then reiterates who they are, over and over, for ten episodes, with little modulation or development. Worse, for a show that sets up and solves a new mystery every episode, the show relies on the utter lack of intelligence of both its two leads and everyone around them.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Daniel D'Addario
    The challenges Blue faces don’t go beyond traditional sitcom fare--meddling parents, kids developing minds of their own, balancing marriage and work--all of which it handles with élan and wit. Where the show loses its footing is in its depiction of Blue’s co-workers, video game designers whose outright misogyny the show makes the strange decision to play as comedy.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 10 Daniel D'Addario
    Arnold’s show is an unpleasant wade through widely-known and speculated-about Trump ephemera, adding little in its first two episodes but the re-emergence of a personality whose frantic need to be in front of the camera makes for painful viewing.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Daniel D'Addario
    Its inquisitiveness and willingness to be bold and fairly uncynical given all the things it’s trying to be is more than welcome.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Daniel D'Addario
    Maniac is a crescendo across genres that doesn’t stop building. ... Its power comes, in part, from its refusal to sprawl. As a trial of something new, Maniac passes every test, and ascends instantly to take its place among the very best TV of the year. Its eagerness to expose unexpected angles is its great gift.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Daniel D'Addario
    It’s early yet, but the moments of genuine pain gleaned from the first moments of the episode redeem the somewhat aimless, camping next 45 minutes. ... In the absence of a greater theme announcing itself, American Horror Story: Apocalypse, ringing in the end of days with weird hairdos and an unbelievable story of the devil himself, counts as something close to escapism.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Daniel D'Addario
    As Thomas Magnum, Hernandez is charming enough, and does yeoman’s work selling the show’s endless voice-over. ... Hernandez deserves the chance to loosen up a bit; hopefully once the show finds its groove, the voice-overs will bear a little bit less exposition, and this new Magnum will come into relief as a character, not just a famous name.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Daniel D'Addario
    A pilot that’s both intriguing, as we see the bits of deception underpinning an all-male clique, and frustrating, as it often strains credulity as well as certain boundaries of taste.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Daniel D'Addario
    My Brilliant Friend is an impressive effort, a translation of novel to screen that preserves certain of its literary qualities while transmuting others into moving and effective TV.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Daniel D'Addario
    For now, centering The First around a family story that hits painful but often-predictable beats and that siphons away what is, elsewhere, a friskily passionate geekiness is a choice that keeps the worthy show from soaring.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Daniel D'Addario
    Miguel is a good person, on a mission to rescue his sister, a good person suffering through the trauma the family suffered in an early Purge. They’re white-hat heroes, and as flatly uninteresting as the title implies. Other elements of the story bring in enough ambiguity for core fans to stick with this series to its conclusion.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Daniel D'Addario
    You has sharp ideas, if sometimes expressed with thudding lack of subtlety, about social media; it has an interesting premise; it gets the hip-young-literary-Manhattan setting as satisfyingly almost-right as did “Gossip Girl,” in the manner where its departures from reality end up feeling refreshing and fun. But it doesn’t quite have the courage of its convictions.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Daniel D'Addario
    Teens, the show’s obvious intended audience, will relate to The Innocents' high dudgeon, but adults will find a show that punches above its weight, defined by both its stirringly dramatic tone and the two charming performances at its center.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Daniel D'Addario
    The sequences in the field often falter when depicting action: The explosions and combat, despite the show’s big budget, can come off confusing and underwhelming. But Ryan, feeling his way through situations he never encountered behind the desk, provides a worthy anchor for our attention. Best of all, the show knows when to get the character out of the way and concentrate on telling other stories.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Daniel D'Addario
    The show’s second season provides little thrill of discovery, no amplification of what themes it possesses, and barely any real movement outside the hermetic world the Byrdes share.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Daniel D'Addario
    While early installments are too committed to wheel-spinning setup, sparky humor and rapport develops later in the season. [7 Sep 2018, p.109]
    • tbd Metascore
    • 30 Daniel D'Addario
    The more "real life" is integrated into Castaways, the more false it feels: Forcing messy personal history into brief scenes in the "Lost" template is an uneasy fit. [31 Jul 2018, p.77]
    • Variety
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Daniel D'Addario
    Too much of what Season 2 presents feels dully familiar, less playing with genre tropes than serving them back up, reheated. ... But the show is anchored by performers who engage even when the enterprise threatens to fall apart. Bill Pullman returns as Harry Ambrose, a detective whose deep wells of angst help him to read situations other cops can't fathom. His saltiness and Coon's smug disregard make for a potent combination, one that deserved a richer premise. [24 Jul 2018, p.65]
    • Variety
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Daniel D'Addario
    What a pleasant surprise, then, that Who Is America? feels both as richly comic as anything Baron Cohen has done in the decade-plus since “Borat” and urgently resonant with our own.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Daniel D'Addario
    It’s eerie-by-the-numbers, repeatedly telling us quite how scared we ought to be, without yet building characters for whom we feel sympathetic fear.

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